CO-CURRICULAR CREDITS

Students in Level 2 and level 3 of their programme are eligible for co-curricular credits. Look for them when registering on CHOL. Co-curricular credits count toward your degree completion and can enhance your curriculum vitae!
 
You can earn a maximum of three credits while taking part in any of the following courses offered during the semester

Courses

Course Title Course Code
Sports Courses
Athletics
Basketball
Cricket
Football
Netball
Volleyball

COCR 2001
COCR 2002
COCR 2003
COCR 2004
COCR 2005
COCR 2006
Debating COCR 2010
Leadership with Service COCR 2015
Peer Education in Response to HIV/AIDS 
(Semester 1 only)
COCR 2030
Using Photography to Document University Life COCR 2052
Alcohol and Other Drugs of Abuse COCR 2060
Student Entrepreneurial Empowerment Development (SEED)  
(Semester 1 only)
COCR 2070
Basic Peer Helping COCR 2071
Sea Turtle Project
(Semester 1, conditions apply)
COCR
 

Sports courses

It is expected that students will develop an appreciation of the importance of the sport of choice as part of healthy life-style practices; develop an understanding of the sport of choice, including a historical perspective; understand the implications of interpersonal interactions in sports; develop correct techniques in the sport of choice, carry out specific routines of activities using various parts of the body; develop physical fitness; develop the ability to move skillfully and effectively in specified active situations; understand the anatomical structure and physiological functions of systems of the body as they relate to sport; work effectively as a team to develop skills in leadership, critical thinking and problem solving; take active part in a major sporting activity for at least one semester; outline procedures for the prevention and treatment of certain injuries and understand the importance of proper training and conditioning. Students must attend a minimum of 75% of the seminars and the practical sessions. 
3 Credit hours (2 Lecture hours, 1 Other hour)

Debating- COCR 2010

The primary aims of the activity are to assist students in developing their linguistic and intellectual skills and to broaden their knowledge of contemporary issues. Students seeking to gain co-curricular credit in Debating are expected to attend the following: workshops on public speaking and debating skills; lectures/discussions on a variety of current issues; or undertake research on a variety of current issues. It is expected that in undertaking this activity students would develop an appreciation of the art of debating; demonstrate effective debating skills; work effectively in a team; develop practical skills in debating; take active part in a major debating project; develop the ability to critically analyse and assess a variety of social political, economic and cultural issues; become familiar with a variety of national, regional and international issues. Students interested in pursuing this course should consult the Office of Student Services. 
3 Credit hours (2 Lecture hours, 1 Other hour)

Leadership Service- COCR 2015

The primary aim of the activity is to prepare students for leadership and service within the Campus and the wider community. Students seeking to gain co-curricular credit for Leadership/Service are expected to: attend Lectures/Seminars on the following topics such as time management and financial management. and undertake community or Guild Service activities. Students interested in pursuing this course should consult with the Office of Student Services. 
3 Credit hours (2 Lecture hours, 1 Other hour)

Peer Education in Response to HIV/AIDS- COCR 2030

The primary aim of this course is to prepare students for leadership in response to the challenge of HIV and AIDS in the University, the wider community and in future life. Students are expected to attend six (2 hour) lectures, seminars or workshops and undertake 20 hours of internship service activity. For more information see attached flyer COCR2030
3 Credit hours (2 Lecture hours)

University Choral Singing- COCR 2050

This course presents opportunities for students to develop technical and musical performance skills outside of their declared majors. It helps build good citizenship skills and a greater appreciation of Caribbean musical history and culture. Students research, learn and perform culturally significant Caribbean music and/or use musical genres to interpret selected music as part of a formal university choir programme of the Errol Barrow Centre for Creative Imagination. 
3 Credit hours (2 Lecture hours, 1 Other hour)

Using Photography to Document University Life- COCR 2052

This course presents opportunities for students to develop technical and artistic photographic skills outside of their declared majors. It helps build good citizenship skills and a greater appreciation of the activities and important moments of university and community life. Students develop technical and artistic photographic skills through the documentation of aspects of university and community life as part of the Photography Club. This co curricular course is supervised by the Errol Barrow Centre for Creative Imagination. 
3  Credit hours (2 Lecture hours, 1 Other hour)

Alcohol and Other Drugs of Abuse- COCR 2060

This course is as much academic, as it is introspective. It seeks to teach students how to manage their entry into academia and to be aware of the life challenges and social pressures affecting them in adulthood. Developing awareness and an understanding of drug and alcohol use and abuse, its impact on society, the family, on the workplace, drunk driving, illegal drugs and risky sexual behavior, especially with multiple partners, are some of the diverse topic areas to be discussed.
3 Credit hours (2 Lecture hours, 1 Other hour)

Student Entrepreneurial Empowerment Development (SEED)- COCR 2070

The Student Entrepreneurial Empowerment Development (SEED) Course was designed to develop self-reliance, innovativeness and entrepreneurship among students at the Cave Hill campus. The ultimate goal of the project is to expand employment choices so that graduates would not rely entirely on the availability of jobs in the public and private sectors, but consider launching and operating their own businesses thereby ensuring employment for self and others. The SEED Course is an exciting, motivational programme which provides a safe and educational environment in which students may explore their entrepreneurial ideas. At the end of the Course it is anticipated that students will understand the basic characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, the risks and rewards of entrepreneurship and small business ownership, the importance of networking, the need to conduct careful business research and to develop business and market plans. In addition, students will be aware of the organisations that support small business, the relevant legislation including incentives applicable to small businesses and the requirements of agencies responsible for supporting and financing small businesses. 
3 Credit hours (2 Lecture hours, 1 Other hour)

Basic Peer Helping- COCR 2071

This course seeks to assist students to develop basic helping skills to aid other students who may be experiencing a problem or a crisis. The course also aims to assist participants to develop skills to be resource persons for students on campus and the wider community. The course builds on a three stage model of helping which includes basic relating with others, understanding people’s experiences and assisting people to engage in problem solving strategies. The course also aims to support helpers to appreciate themselves better, understand and challenge their biases as well as become familiar with the potential resources both on and off campus aimed at helping students who may be experiencing a crisis. 
3 Credit hours 

Sea Turtle Project- COCR 20

This activity provides students with an introduction to the different components of a long-running monitoring and conservation programme for an endangered species. The aims of the activity are to provide hands-on training in data collection on marine turtles and their habitats, and to develop skills to implement the actions necessary to conserve them. Students will be exposed to both biological (i.e data required to inform scientifically sound conservation actions) and sociological (i.e effective engagement of stakeholders - Government agencies, hotel staff, visitors and fisher folk) aspects of conservation. Students will gain skills and experience in survey methodologies, in actions designed to alleviate threats to sea turtles and effective communication with stakeholders.
3 Credit hours (Registration will occur in Semester I but permission to register will be based on satisfactory fieldwork - consisting of a minimum of two 8-hr sessions per week (8pm-4am and/or 8am-4pm) - conducted over 8 weeks between June 1 and August 31 in the previous summer.
One 8-hr session per week ( 8pm-4am and/or 8am-4pm) will continue after registration for the first 4 weeks of Semester I)

 

The Office of Student Services
Tel.: (246) 417-4165/6/7 Fax: (246) 424-5348 | Email: studentservices@cavehill.uwi.edu