Department of Language, Linguistics and Literature
Literatures in English Courses

Level I Level II Level III

The Faculty reserves the right to withdraw or to add courses as may be necessary or desirable, but except in cases of extreme emergency or difficulty no course will be added or withdrawn during an academic year. The Faculty does not guarantee that all courses listed in the following pages will be available this academic year. Time-tabling constraints may impose additional restrictions on the combinations of courses permissible. Students should consult the timetable and seek advice from the Faculty before finalising their registration. Students are not permitted to register for courses that clash on the timetable.
 

Level I

LITS1001 Introduction to Poetry: The study of samples of poetry in English from various cultures and periods designed to promote an understanding of how poetry works and competence in practical criticism.

LITS1002 Introduction to Prose Fiction: An introduction to the history and development of, as well as critical concepts necessary for analyzing, prose fiction.

LITS1003 Introduction to Drama: An introduction to the study of drama with emphasis on the process of translating text into performance. Students will be introduced to the basics of dramatic theory and criticism and given an overview of the historical development of drama.

LITS1005 Writing About Literature: An introduction to the fundamental concepts of literary criticism that aims at the cultivation of critical skills. The primary goal is the provision of the tools necessary for confident, self-conscious critical analysis and experience in writing about literary prose, drama and poetry. In addition to text-based and other critical perspectives, the course addresses matters of style and referencing. This is a very practical course that will examine samples of actual student writing.

FILM1000: Introduction to Cinema: An overview of world cinema classics, their history and the evolution of film making.
 

Level II

LITS2001 Poetry I: A survey of canonical poetry written during the Renaissance and Neo-Classical periods, focusing on some of the following poets: Wyatt, Sidney, Ralegh, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Milton, Dryden and Pope. [Prereq.: LITS1001]

LITS2002 Poetry II: A survey of canonical poetry written during the Romantic and Victorian periods, focusing on some of the following poets: Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Elizabeth Browning, Robert Browning, Arnold, Christina Rosetti, and Hopkins. [Prereq.: LITS1001]

LITS2005 Chaucer: An introduction to Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and the Middle English language in which he wrote. [Prereq.: LITS1001]

LITS2013 Milton: An introduction to Milton’s most important works, including Paradise Lost and Samson Agonistes. [Prereq.: LITS1001]

LITS2101 Novel I: A survey of the ‘rise of the novel’ in the eighteenth century that explores some characteristic forms and concerns of early prose fiction in English. [Prereq.: LITS1002]

LITS2102 Novel II: A survey of representative nineteenth century novels with attention paid to literary and social developments from the Regency to the late Victorian periods. [Prereq.: LITS1002]

LITS2117 American Novel: A survey of canonical American texts from the mid-nineteenth to twentieth centuries with attention paid to the literary and social developments of this period. [Prereq.: LITS1002]

LITS2118 African-American Fiction: An examination of the major movements of African American literature, including the Harlem Renaissance and the Modernist phase. Beginning with an examination of the links between African American texts and African oral traditions, it explores ways in which canonical African American fiction responds to significant cultural and political developments. The main genres selected are the slave narrative, the short story and the novel, but important plays, poetry and nonfictional work will also be considered. [Prereq.: LITS1002]

LITS2203 Shakespeare I: An introduction to the comedies and histories. [Prereq.: LITS1003]

LITS2204 Shakespeare II: An introduction to the tragedies and romances. [Prereq.: LITS1003]

LITS2207 Introduction to Shakespeare: A survey of Shakespeare’s works. [Prereq.: LITS1003]

LITS2209 Renaissance Drama: An introduction to the historical period, its theatrical forms, and the crucial connections which exist between the drama and the politics of the time. [Prereq.: LITS1003]

LITS2306 History of Criticism: An introduction to the foundations of critical theory / aesthetics by surveying the historical development of the field from the Classical period to the early twentieth century.

LITS2307 Modern Literary Theory: An introduction to several schools of Continental philosophy and critical theory (chosen from Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Phenomenology) of particular relevance to the Caribbean as well as Feminist, Post-colonial and African American thinkers who have engaged with these schools. [Prereq.: LITS2306]

LITS2403 Caribbean Popular Culture: An examination of a range of popular culture forms within Caribbean society, including popular song, Caribbean film, music video, graffiti, the political speech, the sermon, cartoons, the popular press, performance poetry.

LITS2404 African Prose Fiction: A survey of selected examples of African fiction.

LITS2499 Drama and Theatre Arts: An exploration of a range of plays from a practical point of view, that is, plays as scripts for performance, not just as texts to be read. [equivalent to 2 semester-long courses and worth 6 credits]

LITS2502 Caribbean Women Writers: An exploration of a selection of Caribbean women’s writing in English to determine whether it is possible to generalize about the subject matter of their texts and the ways in which this material is articulated. [Prereq.: LITS1001, LITS1002 and LITS1003]

LITS2514 West Indian Literary Classics I: An introduction to a range of West Indian classics across the genres. Some of the authors covered are: Brathwaite, Walcott, Rhys, Lovelace, Mais, Anthony, Shinebourne, Harris, Selvon. [Prereq.: LITS1001, LITS1002 and LITS1003]

LITS2516 West Indian Literary Classics II: This course complements LITS 2514 West Indian Literary Classics I, ensuring that students achieve knowledge of a range of regional writing by recognised authors. It includes six representative works in various genres in order to foster generic and intertextual cross-fertilization. [Prereq.: LITS1001, LITS1002 and LITS1003]

LITS2603 Creative Writing: Poetry: A workshop course in the writing of poetry in which students are required to write regularly and to submit new pieces of their work at least once a fortnight for discussion.

LITS2604 Creative Writing: Prose Fiction: A workshop-based course focusing on the attributes of the short story, through reading, practical exercises and writing.

LITS2801 African Writing and Quality: An interdisciplinary introduction (French and English) to the main forms of traditional orature – ritual, praising, epic, proverbs, story telling – that aims to provide the grounds for a specifically African aesthetic. Filmed dramatizations will be as important as written texts. [same as FREN2801]
 

Level III

LITS3001 Modern Poetry: A survey of poetry written during the period 1890 to 1945 by some of the following poets: Hardy, Frost, Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Dylan Thomas, Auden, Hughes, Cullen, McKay. [Prereq.: one of LITS2001, LITS2002, LITS2005, LITS2013]

LITS3003 Contemporary Poetry: A survey of poetry written since World War II by some of the following poets: Baraka, Bishop, Brooks, E. E. Cummings, Larkin, Ginsberg, Giovanni, Gunn, Heaney, Ted Hughes, Lorde, Lowell, Plath, Stevens, Rich. [Prereq.: one of LITS2001, LITS2002, LITS2005, LITS2013]

LITS3101 Modern Prose Fiction: An introduction to some of the techniques and concerns of early modern fiction by writers ranging from Kakfka to Lawrence. [Prereq.: one of LITS2101, LITS2102, LITS2117, LITS2118]

LITS3102 Contemporary Prose Fiction: A modular course in which students examine four movements or sub-genres in modern fiction such as the psychological novel, modern utopias, the political novel, and the novella. [Prereq.: one of LITS2101, LITS2102, LITS2117, LITS2118]

LITS3301 Issues in Criticism: An exploration of selected topics in critical theory / aesthetics and related philosophical fields such as the audience, authorship, (literary) form, (literary) history, representation, identity, language, etc. [Prereq.: LITS2306]

LITS3303 Modern Critical Theory: An introduction to several schools of Continental philosophy and critical theory (chosen from Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Phenomenology) of particular relevance to the Caribbean as well as Feminist, Post-colonial and African American thinkers who have engaged with these schools. [Prereq.: LITS2306]

LITS3304 Post-Structuralisms and Post-Colonialisms: An introduction to several schools of Continental philosophy and critical theory that may be grouped under the rubric 'Post-Structuralism' (chosen from Deconstruction, Dialogism, Foucauldian and Deleuzean Thought, Structuralism, Structuralist Marxism, and Structuralist Psychoanalysis) as well as Feminist, Post-colonial and African American thinkers who have engaged with these schools. [Prereq.: LITS2306]

LITS3405 Caribbean Popular Culture II: Building on LITS2403, this course provides a more in depth assessment of various aspects of Caribbean popular culture. This course will normally pay more attention to leading-edge developments in Caribbean culture and critical discourse. [Prereq.: LITS2403]

LITS3501 Advanced Seminar in West Indian Literature: For students who want to deepen their knowledge of West Indian literature by researching topics of current scholarly interest and developments in related literary theory. The focus varies from year to year, and may involve topics such as ‘West Indian autobiography,’ ‘migration and the West Indian diaspora’ or ‘post-colonial constructions in West Indian literature.’ This course is one of the approved Level III substitutes for HUMN3099 Caribbean Studies. [Prereq.: One of LITS2502, LITS2514, or LITS2516]

LITS3502 West Indian Literature: Special Author Seminar: For students who want to do intensive research on the work of a single West Indian Writer. This course is one of the approved Level III substitutes for HUMN3099 Caribbean Studies. [Prereq.: One of LITS2502, LITS2514, or  LITS2516]

LITS3601 African Literature I: the Aesthetics of African Literature: An introduction to classics of the African canon, alongside newer, experimental writing. Underlying the course is the question of what we mean by ‘African.’ This course is one of the approved Level III substitutes for HUMN3099 Caribbean Studies.

LITS3602 African Literature II: African Narrative in Film and Text: A counterpart to LITS 3601, this course examines the nature of African narrative, its debt to orality and its innovations, by comparing filmic and written texts. This course is one of the approved Level III substitutes for HUMN3099 Caribbean Studies.

LITS3603 African Film: An introduction to the cinemas of Africa as well as to film language and critical concepts. We examine the intertextuality of filmic narrative techniques with indigenous African (oral) narrative forms, to be able to relate these to an African film aesthetic. This course is one of the approved Level III substitutes for HUMN3099 Caribbean Studies.
 

Faculty of Humanities and Education
Telephone: (246) 417-4385/87 Fax: (246) 424-0634 E-mail: humanities@cavehill.uwi.edu